11:54 pm - Fri, Feb 21, 2014
749 notes

India’s Stonewall

This is a first in a series of articles about LGBT activism and a look at bisexuality in India.

On a sweltering day in July 2009 the Delhi high court, in a landmark decision, struck down Section 377 of the Indian Penal Code. Section 377 is an archaic anti-sodomy law imposed by the British but one that remains in force in several former British Colonies around the world. LGBT activists in India had worked tirelessly for more than a decade to facilitate this legal victory.

It was relatively short-lived, however, as the Supreme Court of India decided last month to reverse the Delhi High Court’s decision and reinstate section 377…

People across the world have expressed outrage at the Indian Supreme Court’s ruling. Rallies and protests were held in several major cities worldwide in a Global Day of Rage. Local activists are calling this ruling the Stonewall of India’s LGBT rights movement and have already launched major initiatives in their continued fight for equality.

Homophobia is not the genetic encoding of the people of India. If the colonizers implemented laws restricting freedom of gender and sexual expression, what was it like before they arrived?

I decided to ask Ruth Vanita, Ph.D., one of the preeminent scholars on same-sex issues in Indian culture and society. Dr. Vanita is an Indian academic, activist and author who specializes in lesbian and gay studies, gender studies, British and South Asian literary history. She is the author of several books including the Lambda Literary Award finalist Same-Sex Love in India: Readings from Literature and History that she co-edited with Saleem Kidwai. Her latest book Gender, Sex and the City explores the representation in Urdu of polyamorous male and female bisexuality in precolonial Lucknow. She is now a professor at the University of Montana in the Liberal Studies Program.

Click HERE to read the article including the full interview with Professor Vanita.


Anil Vora is a principal partner at Indian Tiger Films, a film production company spotlighting films about LGBTQ people of color. A self-confessed geek, VORAcious in his consumption of books and films, Anil is also an actor and playwright, and teaches private classes on the history, symbolism, and appreciation of Bollywood films.

3:24 pm - Sat, Jan 25, 2014
340 notes

Ready for Creating Change 2014 – The Bisexual Institute

The Bisexual/Non-Monosexual Organizing Institute at Creating Change 2014 will have a lot of innovative elements this year. A Twitter version of the institute will occur simultaneous to the activities in the room using the hashtag #BiCC14. People who can’t be physically present can participate in a twitter conversation with each other and the institute participants using that hashtag.

M’Kali-Hashiki will tweet and lead the twitter conversation. To our knowledge, this is a first for an institute at Creating Change.

In addition to the Twitter conversation, we will be using Theatre of the Oppressed (TO) techniques in the institute. TO is a process of social analysis, critique and change that incorporates games and activities from the theatre. I’ve been training in and practicing TO since the late 1990s and am excited to bring this resource to the discussion of bisexual organizing in the institute. We will warm up to the TO activities with Breath Work facilitated by M’Kali-Hashiki, Small Group Discussions organized by Paul, and an adaptation of a Life Mapping Exercise I facilitate with my students each semester at Goddard College. BiNet USA provided financial support for some of the life mapping materials.

Paul, M’Kali-Hashiki and I really want to make sure that the institute engages the personal as political and a holistic understanding of social justice organizing. We hope our efforts pay off in the experiences of everyone involved and the impact the institute has on their work …

The Institute which is open to ALL non-monosexual queer folks and allies who are deeply committed to supporting us through their actions, resources, access and/or privilege. takes place at Creating Change Houston 2014 on Thursday, January 30th, from 9am-6pm Central Time at the Hilton-Americas Houston TX USA, and through #BiCC14 on Twitter. We also look forward to seeing all you at in the Suite Bi + Bi” the official Bisexual Hospitality Center during the 5 day event.

Click HERE to read the full article about the 2014 Organizing Institute


Dr. Herukhuti is a clinical sociologist, cultural studies scholar, performance artist, and neotraditional African shaman who focuses on sexuality, gender, and spirituality themes within Africa and the Diaspora. His is the author of Conjuring Black Funk: Notes on Culture, Sexuality, and Spirituality, co-editor of Sexuality, Religion and the Sacred: Bisexual, Panexual and Polysexual Perspectives.

He is currently co-editing an Anthology of works by Bisexual/Non-monosexual Queer Men with Robyn Ochs and is a co-organizer of the Bisexual Institute at the 2014 Creating Change Conference in January 2014 in Houston TX and is working on the development on a website for conversation, e-learning, and community building related to sexuality and spirituality.

2:29 pm - Thu, Jan 16, 2014
264 notes
Queer (In)Justice: A Review
Simultaneously informative and infuriating, “Queer (In)Justice: The Criminalization of LGBT People in the United States” is a searing examination of queer experiences—as “suspects,” defendants, prisoners, and survivors of crime …
Painstakingly researched and written by Joey Mogul, Andrea Ritchie, and Kay Whitlock – all of whom have worked tirelessly for social justice causes – the book uncovers the underlying, interlocking causes and effects of how our thinking about sex, class, race, and gender is contributing to a system that is both out of control and dangerous, particularly to those who deviate from socially mandated gender and sexual norms …
The authors credit the work of LGBT advocacy organizations to repeal sodomy laws and pass hate crimes legislation. But they also contend that, in mainstream gay discourse:


“messages are crafted to emphasize reassuring images of LGBT normalcy and friendliness, not to embrace and highlight the struggles of segments of the LGBT population that continue to be criminalized.”


It is a great companion book to ‘The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness’, Michelle Alexander’s searing critique of the war on drugs and the resulting surge in criminalizing people of color in the United States.
Click HERE to read the full book review
Anil Vora is a principal partner at Indian Tiger Films, a film production company spotlighting films about LGBTQ people of color. A self-confessed geek, VORAcious in his consumption of books and films, Anil is also an actor and playwright, and teaches private classes on the history, symbolism, and appreciation of Bollywood films.

Queer (In)Justice: A Review

Simultaneously informative and infuriating, Queer (In)Justice: The Criminalization of LGBT People in the United States is a searing examination of queer experiences—as “suspects,” defendants, prisoners, and survivors of crime …

Painstakingly researched and written by Joey Mogul, Andrea Ritchie, and Kay Whitlock – all of whom have worked tirelessly for social justice causes – the book uncovers the underlying, interlocking causes and effects of how our thinking about sex, class, race, and gender is contributing to a system that is both out of control and dangerous, particularly to those who deviate from socially mandated gender and sexual norms …

The authors credit the work of LGBT advocacy organizations to repeal sodomy laws and pass hate crimes legislation. But they also contend that, in mainstream gay discourse:

“messages are crafted to emphasize reassuring images of LGBT normalcy and friendliness, not to embrace and highlight the struggles of segments of the LGBT population that continue to be criminalized.”

It is a great companion book to The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, Michelle Alexander’s searing critique of the war on drugs and the resulting surge in criminalizing people of color in the United States.

Click HERE to read the full book review


Anil Vora is a principal partner at Indian Tiger Films, a film production company spotlighting films about LGBTQ people of color. A self-confessed geek, VORAcious in his consumption of books and films, Anil is also an actor and playwright, and teaches private classes on the history, symbolism, and appreciation of Bollywood films.

11:28 am - Thu, Dec 26, 2013
625 notes

The Controversy Around ‘Blue is the Warmest Color’: A Case Study in Bi Erasure and Public Hysteria

Blue Is the Warmest Colour is an unfortunate title for a great film… The story is deceptively simple: Adèle a high-school student, meets Emma an advanced Fine Art student with blue hair at a lesbian bar, they fall in love, have incredibly hot sex, live together, and eventually break up … In the deafening cacophony of OMG, there are naked women having sex here are some absurd and reactionary comments —-

Almost every review and headline has characterized this film as a “lesbian love story”. Emma may be lesbian. We learn that she has had relationships only with women. But the film deliberately avoids labeling Adèle’s identity.

Dr. Pepper Schwartz, sexologist and Professor of Sociology at the University of Washington, made this emphatic claim in an article for CNN: “The chilling part of this film is that it’s basically the story of an adult woman poaching on a high-schooler”. Like countless critics, Dr. Schwartz reduces the film to porn that she would not recommend to teenagers … Dr. Schwartz seems unconcerned by the fact that Adèle chain-smokes but warns that Adèle’s lovemaking with a woman who is her partner is too damaging for us to watch …

Then there are those saying the sex is unreal, too clinical, filmed through a male gaze, blah, blah, blah. Why aren’t we celebrating the fact that these scenes even exist? There are three explicit sex scenes adding up to nearly 10 full minutes of nude, girl-on-girl action in an award winning film …

And finally, the ugly truth that no one wants to admit. The film beautifully explores how the sexual barometer can grow cold and change the nature of a relationship. For those who have not seen the film, minor spoiler alert for what follows. In a harrowing scene, Emma breaks up with Adèle for reasons that would be devastating to any relationship but pose a particular challenge to same-sex relationships: class difference and biphobia

Few films have accurately captured the quotidian life of the French middle class … The more successful and profitable that Emma becomes as an artist the more she shuts down emotionally. She also begins to feel shame about Adèle’s modest ambition to become a schoolteacher … Is Emma furious that Adèle cheated on her? Or that Adèle had sex with a man? Or is Emma simply jealous that Adèle hasn’t reached emotional frigidity like she has?

The film offers no easy answers. It simply documents the devastation on Adèle and, in the end, only hints at a brighter future for her.

Click HERE to read the full article


Anil Vora is a principal partner at Indian Tiger Films, a film production company spotlighting films about LGBTQ people of color. A self-confessed geek, VORAcious in his consumption of books and films, Anil is also an actor and playwright, and teaches private classes on the history, symbolism, and appreciation of Bollywood films.

9:33 am - Wed, Dec 18, 2013
116 notes

Hawaii Senator Thinks Bisexuals May “Exploit” State’s Gay Marriage

Hurrah, "gay" marriage is now legal in Hawaii. Only problem is, at least one state senator who has been against it all along is now saying that the law doesn’t pertain to bisexuals. This is of course, not true.

The Hawaiʻi Marriage Equality Act of 2013 took effect December 2nd 2013. The Marriage Act allows same-sex couples to exercise the freedom to marry in Hawaiʻi on the same terms as different-sex couples. There is nothing in the law that addresses in any way, how either of the parties self-identify.

HI State Senator Mike Gabbard, a Blue Dog (i.e socially conservative) Democrat, voted against the same-sex marriage bill a number of times, but his latest reason is particularly biphobic. In the passage of the same-sex laws, the Hawaii lawmakers “seem to have forgotten their bisexual brothers and sisters.” He declared that bisexuals would not be allowed to marry.

Additionally the Hawaiian Republicans were also at the forefront of the biphobia, sponsoring radio ads telling listeners: "bisexual marriage is right around the corner."

Where both State Senator Gabbard as well as the Republican Party went badly wrong is in their interpretations of bisexuality.

While mainstream lesbian/gay groups along with their progressive allies continue to denounce and disprove the ridiculous statements that the anti-marriage activists persist in making, sadly the bigots seemed to have hit the jackpot with the scary "bisexual marriage" menace. Instead of countering the slur and defending the largest part of the LGBT Community, pro-marriage advocates have either stayed silent, given confused answers, made jokes or some combination of these, while trying to seek "clarification" from mainstream gay/lesbian groups.

May we respectfully suggest that in the future, when faced with discussing issues pertaining to the bisexual community people should get into the habit of always asking reputable national and regional bisexual groups such as the American Institute of Bisexuality and BiNet USA or the Bisexual Organizing Project and the Bisexual Resource Center instead?

Click HERE to read the full article


Mike Szymanski is a critically acclaimed journalist including two Hearst Awards for investigative reporting & feature writing; a film critic; and popular columnist who writes the widely read Bisexuality Examiner. A bisexual activist since the early 1980s, he first came out as a gay writer but then found himself sneaking around with a girlfriend for a few years. So then he had to come out second time, this time as bisexual. He was previously a media coordinator for BiNet USA, and now teaches journalism at UCLA. He is also an award-winning author of several books with bisexual themes, including co-authoring the Lambda Award Winning Bisexuals Guide to the Universe.

8:40 pm - Sun, Dec 8, 2013
321 notes
Mandela: Why He Matters in LGBTQ History
I was having a Skype conversation with someone and talking about the price of living one’s commitment to social justice and ecological wellbeing. The sound on my television had been off. I looked up from my computer screen to see printed across the television that he, Madiba Rolihlahla Mandela (known to the world as Nelson Mandela), had become an ancestor—one of the world’s cherished ancestors.
The moment was singed with poignancy, awe and reverence. Hearing about his ancestral transition—as an activist of African ancestry who came of age as an activist shortly after the movement to get governments, corporations and education institutions to financially divest from apartheid South Africa, I connected with the enormity of the personal sacrifice Madiba made as a revolutionary activist, a political prisoner for the twenty-seven years and later as a President and iconic symbol of his country. Such sacrifice makes tragic the everyday efforts by each of us to get a seat at the table of privilege and access, enjoy middle class happiness and comfort, and receive rewards and recognition for our tacit complicity with imperialist white supremacist capitalist patriarchy. How small those efforts appear in the face of such extraordinary work by an ordinary person like Madiba—for he was not born the international figure of revolutionary struggle and moral achievement so much as he became that figure.
Given the history of his work to end apartheid and institute ethnic justice, Madiba’s commitment to social justice and ecological wellbeing has to be thoughtfully considered in the context of the early moments of post-apartheid South Africa. In the midst of tremendous pressures to focus exclusively on healing the wounds created by centuries of white supremacist oppression and state-sponsored racialized terrorism, South Africa chose, the seemingly inconceivable path for the mid 1990s, to inscribe in the founding constitution of the nation a prohibition against discrimination based upon sexual orientation and gender. …
I, like many people of color with a critical analysis of race, cringe when LGBTQ organizations with little to no authentic relationship to people of color communities attempt to comment about events and issues that directly affect us, e.g., George Zimmerman murder trial verdict or heterosexism and trans-hatred in our communities. But it is equally distasteful for such LGBTQ organizations to ignore, marginalize or deny the impact or role played by people of color in the advancement of sexuality and gender equality such as the Stonewall Riots or the advancement of equality in the South African constitution. So I am honored that the American Institute of Bisexuality asked me to pen this article for Bi Magazine.
Madiba’s South Africa has special significance in bisexual history. It was shortly after Madiba’s presidency that bisexual activists and other LGBTQ delegates at the 1999 International Lesbian and Gay Association (ILGA) World Conference in Johannesburg, South Africa commemorated the first day celebrating bisexuals and bisexual experience.
Let us not forget the person that became the symbol. He was a son, husband, father, grandfather and member of a tribal family. He was also marked as a terrorist by various governments around the world. He was a community and youth organizer. He was a political prisoner. He was a politician and statesman. He was the physical embodiment of the struggle against imperialist white supremacist capitalist patriarchy. He was the leader of a movement—fist in the air, chanting, “Amandla!” He was a person who decided that personal comforts were not enough to sustain a life, freedom and justice were worth the effort and oppression, however insidious and vitriolic, was unsustainable. If we maintain a relationship with his humanity and its complexities, we may very well gain from his life what we need to do our own work. Madiba, may your ancestors and Divinities embrace you in peace, love, and grace.
Click HERE to read the full article
Dr. Herukhuti is a clinical sociologist, cultural studies scholar, performance artist, and neotraditional African shaman who focuses on sexuality, gender, and spirituality themes within Africa and the Diaspora. His is the author of Conjuring Black Funk: Notes on Culture, Sexuality, and Spirituality, co-editor of Sexuality, Religion and the Sacred: Bisexual, Panexual and Polysexual Perspectives and is currently co-editing an Anthology of works by Bisexual/Non-monosexual Queer Men with Robyn Ochs and is a co-organizer of the Bisexual Institute at the 2014 Creating Change Conference in January 2014 in Houston TX. The founder of the Center for Culture, Sexuality and Spirituality, Dr. Herukhuti is currently working on the development on a website for conversation, e-learning, and community building related to sexuality and spirituality.

Mandela: Why He Matters in LGBTQ History

I was having a Skype conversation with someone and talking about the price of living one’s commitment to social justice and ecological wellbeing. The sound on my television had been off. I looked up from my computer screen to see printed across the television that he, Madiba Rolihlahla Mandela (known to the world as Nelson Mandela), had become an ancestor—one of the world’s cherished ancestors.

The moment was singed with poignancy, awe and reverence. Hearing about his ancestral transition—as an activist of African ancestry who came of age as an activist shortly after the movement to get governments, corporations and education institutions to financially divest from apartheid South Africa, I connected with the enormity of the personal sacrifice Madiba made as a revolutionary activist, a political prisoner for the twenty-seven years and later as a President and iconic symbol of his country. Such sacrifice makes tragic the everyday efforts by each of us to get a seat at the table of privilege and access, enjoy middle class happiness and comfort, and receive rewards and recognition for our tacit complicity with imperialist white supremacist capitalist patriarchy. How small those efforts appear in the face of such extraordinary work by an ordinary person like Madiba—for he was not born the international figure of revolutionary struggle and moral achievement so much as he became that figure.

Given the history of his work to end apartheid and institute ethnic justice, Madiba’s commitment to social justice and ecological wellbeing has to be thoughtfully considered in the context of the early moments of post-apartheid South Africa. In the midst of tremendous pressures to focus exclusively on healing the wounds created by centuries of white supremacist oppression and state-sponsored racialized terrorism, South Africa chose, the seemingly inconceivable path for the mid 1990s, to inscribe in the founding constitution of the nation a prohibition against discrimination based upon sexual orientation and gender.

I, like many people of color with a critical analysis of race, cringe when LGBTQ organizations with little to no authentic relationship to people of color communities attempt to comment about events and issues that directly affect us, e.g., George Zimmerman murder trial verdict or heterosexism and trans-hatred in our communities. But it is equally distasteful for such LGBTQ organizations to ignore, marginalize or deny the impact or role played by people of color in the advancement of sexuality and gender equality such as the Stonewall Riots or the advancement of equality in the South African constitution. So I am honored that the American Institute of Bisexuality asked me to pen this article for Bi Magazine.

Madiba’s South Africa has special significance in bisexual history. It was shortly after Madiba’s presidency that bisexual activists and other LGBTQ delegates at the 1999 International Lesbian and Gay Association (ILGA) World Conference in Johannesburg, South Africa commemorated the first day celebrating bisexuals and bisexual experience.

Let us not forget the person that became the symbol. He was a son, husband, father, grandfather and member of a tribal family. He was also marked as a terrorist by various governments around the world. He was a community and youth organizer. He was a political prisoner. He was a politician and statesman. He was the physical embodiment of the struggle against imperialist white supremacist capitalist patriarchy. He was the leader of a movement—fist in the air, chanting, Amandla! He was a person who decided that personal comforts were not enough to sustain a life, freedom and justice were worth the effort and oppression, however insidious and vitriolic, was unsustainable. If we maintain a relationship with his humanity and its complexities, we may very well gain from his life what we need to do our own work. Madiba, may your ancestors and Divinities embrace you in peace, love, and grace.

Click HERE to read the full article


Dr. Herukhuti is a clinical sociologist, cultural studies scholar, performance artist, and neotraditional African shaman who focuses on sexuality, gender, and spirituality themes within Africa and the Diaspora. His is the author of Conjuring Black Funk: Notes on Culture, Sexuality, and Spirituality, co-editor of Sexuality, Religion and the Sacred: Bisexual, Panexual and Polysexual Perspectives and is currently co-editing an Anthology of works by Bisexual/Non-monosexual Queer Men with Robyn Ochs and is a co-organizer of the Bisexual Institute at the 2014 Creating Change Conference in January 2014 in Houston TX. The founder of the Center for Culture, Sexuality and Spirituality, Dr. Herukhuti is currently working on the development on a website for conversation, e-learning, and community building related to sexuality and spirituality.

1:59 pm - Sun, Dec 1, 2013
82 notes
bisexual-community:

World AIDS Day 2013: Getting To Zero This year’s global World AIDS Day theme for 2013 is “Getting to Zero”. This is a part of UNAIDS strategy to reach a world with ZERO new HIV infections, ZERO discrimination and ZERO AIDS-related deaths.

bisexual-community:

World AIDS Day 2013: Getting To Zero 

This year’s global World AIDS Day theme for 2013 is Getting to Zero”. This is a part of UNAIDS strategy to reach a world with ZERO new HIV infections, ZERO discrimination and ZERO AIDS-related deaths.

12:21 pm - Thu, Nov 21, 2013
38 notes
OUT & EQUAL Workplace Summit Celebrates Diversity on 15TH Anniversary
The fifteenth anniversary Out & Equal Workplace Summit took took place in Minneapolis the week of October 28th through the 31, 2013. Out & Equal Workplace Summit, first held in 1999, has grown to become the largest annual LGBT workplace conference in the world. Over 2,000 attendees from over 25 countries shared strategies and best practices to create workplace equality, inclusive of all sexual orientations, gender identities and expressions…

Out & Equal Workplace Advocates, based in San Francisco, is the leading Global Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) devoted to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT) workplace equality and inclusion whose vision is a world where employees are evaluated on their performance, not their sexual orientation or gender identity, expression or characteristics.

The organization’s Bisexual Advisory Committee, chaired by Heidi Bruins Green, coordinated the panel discussion entitled "The A to Z on Bisexuality: Bi Experts Speak Out."
The workshop showcased luminaries of the bisexual community and bisexual scholarship and included an update about the state of the bisexual movement and the influences on it from the workplace and popular culture. The panelists (left to right) were: Ellyn Ruthstrom from Boston’s Bisexual Resource Center (BRC); Lauren Beach from Minneapolis–Saint Paul’s Bisexual Organizing Project (BOP); Denise Penn from the American Institute of Bisexuality (AIB); Faith Cheltenham and Gary North from BiNet USA; Heidi Bruins Green from Out & Equal; and the facilitator bisexual activist, writer and speaker Robyn Ochs, editor of the Bi Women Newsletter.
The Summit comes after a landmark year for progress on LGBT issues in the USA and with the Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA) heading for a vote in the US House of Representatives. The event is sponsored by approximately 100 Corporations and drew Business Leaders and High-profile Speakers from around the world.
Click HERE to read the full article

OUT & EQUAL Workplace Summit Celebrates Diversity on 15TH Anniversary

The fifteenth anniversary Out & Equal Workplace Summit took took place in Minneapolis the week of October 28th through the 31, 2013. Out & Equal Workplace Summit, first held in 1999, has grown to become the largest annual LGBT workplace conference in the world. Over 2,000 attendees from over 25 countries shared strategies and best practices to create workplace equality, inclusive of all sexual orientations, gender identities and expressions…

Out & Equal Workplace Advocates, based in San Francisco, is the leading Global Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) devoted to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT) workplace equality and inclusion whose vision is a world where employees are evaluated on their performance, not their sexual orientation or gender identity, expression or characteristics.

The organization’s Bisexual Advisory Committee, chaired by Heidi Bruins Green, coordinated the panel discussion entitled "The A to Z on Bisexuality: Bi Experts Speak Out."

The workshop showcased luminaries of the bisexual community and bisexual scholarship and included an update about the state of the bisexual movement and the influences on it from the workplace and popular culture. The panelists (left to right) were: Ellyn Ruthstrom from Boston’s Bisexual Resource Center (BRC); Lauren Beach from Minneapolis–Saint Paul’s Bisexual Organizing Project (BOP); Denise Penn from the American Institute of Bisexuality (AIB); Faith Cheltenham and Gary North from BiNet USA; Heidi Bruins Green from Out & Equal; and the facilitator bisexual activist, writer and speaker Robyn Ochs, editor of the Bi Women Newsletter.

The Summit comes after a landmark year for progress on LGBT issues in the USA and with the Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA) heading for a vote in the US House of Representatives. The event is sponsored by approximately 100 Corporations and drew Business Leaders and High-profile Speakers from around the world.

Click HERE to read the full article

1:07 am - Sun, Nov 17, 2013
544 notes
The Bisexual Revolution Will Be Tumbled, YouTubed and Tweeted
Major magazines call us “slacktivists”, a generation of social media savvy youth whose sole contribution to social justice causes consist of clicking “like” on facebook statuses posted by various Big Gay Inc … it is most certainly not true for all of us. In fact the internet and social media are revolutionizing bisexual activism in a positive way that is anything but “slacktivist” …
Tumblr has one of the most active and vibrant bisexual communities anywhere online. There discussions are constantly going on about what it means to be a bisexual, how can we phrase and express our desires in a way that is both true and affirming and inclusive of transgender people.
New ideas are constantly created, discussed and honed, in between posts of pictures of Easter Eggs, Sneakers and much cool bisexual swag to acquire. Among the may voices are such notables as Author Jan Steckel; Academic & Author Shiri Eisner; Vlogger & Artist Ritch Ludlow; Editrix Jen Yockney; Bi Blogger Patrick RichardsFink; Writer Jacqueline Applebee; Salt Lake City’s 1 to 5 Club; 20+ years of bi political action on Bialogue; the discerning reader’s delight Bisexual Books; USA’s Transcending Boundaries Conference & Midwest Bi Activist; Bisexual London and many, many more.
Along with well known writers and academics are thousands of everyday bisexual people. There were people living in rural regions like me … There are big city bisexuals … Everyone brings a different and unique perspective to the bi tumblr community from intersecting issues of race, class, education and age, we all have a different and important perspective on what being a bisexual in the 21st century means.
It is on the internet where the original inclusive definitions of bisexual is being promoted and discussed.
Thanks to the internet’s ability to connect bisexual people, everyone has a voice. What had slowly been being morphed into a dumbed down description of bisexuality as “attraction to men and women” or “attraction to both genders” that were being promoted by the Big Gay/Lesbian Groups and their Straight Allies were deemed unsatisfactory.
And it is on facebook, twitter and tumblr that the old inclusive definitions of bisexual such as “same gender and other genders” or "more then one gender” are being reasserted, not only to other bisexuals but also to larger LGBT blogs and organizations.
Conversations about creating safe and inclusive spaces in the real world abound … When I run into a problem with my real world activism I know I can always pull out my smart phone or go to my laptop and post about it and a large supportive activist community will be there to help me out in solving it … 
Far from being “slacktivists” online bisexual activists are often leading the way, writing, theorizing and discussing things among themselves and saving lives with their displays of pride. Resisting blocks on our identity by major corporations and fighting both online and off for a better world for bisexuals is an amazing thing and far from being “slacktivist”.
Click HERE to read the full article
Aud Traher is a Bisexual-Trans Activist, local LGBT organizer, blogger, local craftperson, a member of the Pennsylvania Student Equality Coalition (PSEC) and anthropology major living in working in a rural community in Eastern Central Pennsylvania. Having been an organizer in the college’s LGBT Group and noticing the need for similar services that included people in the town and countryside, Aud decided to found a local LGBT Group open to all.

The Bisexual Revolution Will Be Tumbled, YouTubed and Tweeted

Major magazines call us slacktivists, a generation of social media savvy youth whose sole contribution to social justice causes consist of clicking “like” on facebook statuses posted by various Big Gay Inc … it is most certainly not true for all of us. In fact the internet and social media are revolutionizing bisexual activism in a positive way that is anything but “slacktivist”

Tumblr has one of the most active and vibrant bisexual communities anywhere online. There discussions are constantly going on about what it means to be a bisexual, how can we phrase and express our desires in a way that is both true and affirming and inclusive of transgender people.

New ideas are constantly created, discussed and honed, in between posts of pictures of Easter Eggs, Sneakers and much cool bisexual swag to acquire. Among the may voices are such notables as Author Jan Steckel; Academic & Author Shiri Eisner; Vlogger & Artist Ritch Ludlow; Editrix Jen Yockney; Bi Blogger Patrick RichardsFink; Writer Jacqueline Applebee; Salt Lake City’s 1 to 5 Club; 20+ years of bi political action on Bialogue; the discerning reader’s delight Bisexual Books; USA’s Transcending Boundaries Conference & Midwest Bi Activist; Bisexual London and many, many more.

Along with well known writers and academics are thousands of everyday bisexual people. There were people living in rural regions like me … There are big city bisexuals … Everyone brings a different and unique perspective to the bi tumblr community from intersecting issues of race, class, education and age, we all have a different and important perspective on what being a bisexual in the 21st century means.

It is on the internet where the original inclusive definitions of bisexual is being promoted and discussed.

Thanks to the internet’s ability to connect bisexual people, everyone has a voice. What had slowly been being morphed into a dumbed down description of bisexuality as “attraction to men and women” or “attraction to both genders” that were being promoted by the Big Gay/Lesbian Groups and their Straight Allies were deemed unsatisfactory.

And it is on facebook, twitter and tumblr that the old inclusive definitions of bisexual such as “same gender and other genders” or "more then one gender” are being reasserted, not only to other bisexuals but also to larger LGBT blogs and organizations.

Conversations about creating safe and inclusive spaces in the real world abound … When I run into a problem with my real world activism I know I can always pull out my smart phone or go to my laptop and post about it and a large supportive activist community will be there to help me out in solving it … 

Far from being “slacktivists” online bisexual activists are often leading the way, writing, theorizing and discussing things among themselves and saving lives with their displays of pride. Resisting blocks on our identity by major corporations and fighting both online and off for a better world for bisexuals is an amazing thing and far from being “slacktivist”.

Click HERE to read the full article


Aud Traher is a Bisexual-Trans Activist, local LGBT organizer, blogger, local craftperson, a member of the Pennsylvania Student Equality Coalition (PSEC) and anthropology major living in working in a rural community in Eastern Central Pennsylvania. Having been an organizer in the college’s LGBT Group and noticing the need for similar services that included people in the town and countryside, Aud decided to found a local LGBT Group open to all.

2:25 pm - Fri, Nov 15, 2013
234 notes

Some Thoughts on Transgender Day of Remembrance 2013

With Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDOR) coming up next Wednesday November 20th 2013, I have always been amazed at TDOR Vigils by the apparent absence of people from the mainstream gay/lesbian commuity, their progressive allies and even sometimes cisgender people from my own bisexual community. After all, those of us who identify as transgender also identify as lesbian, or straight, or gay, or bisexual, or simply as queer-identified.

In such a diverse community, it’s easy for us to fracture into the “Gay Community”, the “Lesbian Community”, or even the “Bisexual Community” or the “Trans* Community”. When the reality is that as a bisexual transgender affirmed woman, I am a member of BOTH the transgender and bisexual communities. When transgender people are murdered, there is a high probability that they had a SEXUAL ORIENTATION! So it really makes very little sense for any LGBTQ+ people, or any person of good will to skip a Transgender Day of Remembrance Vigil simply because Gender Identity is the focus …

So, it’s difficult for me to separate our community and slice and dice the horrific murders into neat little categories …

If we have learned nothing from the Prop 8 decision, and now the Trans* Youth oppression and hatred of the California fundamentalist conservatives and their strange bedfellows the TERF's, then truly our community is lost …

So how does this really work? It is actually quite simple: The hate groups demonize the transgender/gender variant community and create the catalyst for the violence that affects us all. IF they can convince the mainstream Gay/Lesbian Community that the T is a fraud, and create rhetoric of hate, they can instigate conflict which results in escalations of violence … When they yell that we should be put in institutions or camps or call for our separation or say we should be "Stomped into a Mud-hole" and the mainstream Lesbian/Gay Media remains silent, their voice carries as a singular voice of reason in an already confused discussion concerning gender identity …

It’s that simple. When you don’t attend a TDOR Event, when you don’t honor the dead of Transgender Day of Remembrance, when you don’t go to a Vigil you are sending a message loud and clear- The T is the "other" person and people like the TERFs and fundamentalists like NOM have won … So today, if no one has asked you to go to a TDOR Event, please let me invite you to come, listen and read our names, and honor the lives that we’ve lost in Our Collective Communities.

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Allison Woolbert grew up in Silver Bell, Arizona, a remote copper mining community (now a ghost town), where she never quite fit in. She attended Abilene Christian University, where she didn’t fit in either; ended up in the US Air Force, where she definitely did not fit in; and in 2008 was introduced to the Unitarian Universalists (UU), where she finally started to feel like she fit in. She is a two-spirit bisexual-trans*activist, the CEO of Phoenix Consultants Group a national software development firm and the developer of the Transgender Violence Tracking Project.

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